Tag Archives: Chemotherapy

Shibumi – Kata Tactics: Physical Movements – 8 Ancient Concepts

4 Dec

IMPORTANT:

The foregoing is one component Chapter of an overall work describing the Shibumi Kata. To read the work in the order intended, please either click on the Shibumi Kata Page Tab above for a full Table Of Contents or this convenient            link: https://senseijohn.me/shibumi-kata/

Shibumi Tactics (Physical Movements OF Kata):

The tactics employed in the Shibumi kata to modify “Dean’s” depleted physical condition associated with cancer and chemotherapy and the psychological effects of fighting the disease are ancient in nature. These principles date back in time to the earliest formulation of the martial arts.

It has been said that there are eight primordial principles that envelope the martial arts and karate. These principles have been delineated in an ancient martial text called “The Bubishi”. The principles are also inferred within the martial work known as the “Eight Poems Of The Chinese Fist.” (See below for the full text of the poems).

I have used these eight ancient principles to create the foundation for the physical movements and psychological and emotional aspects of the Shibumi Kata.

I have grouped the eight principles into four sequences. Each sequence has two competing principles. The physical movements and psychological aspects of each sequence provide a varied means of modifying the performers physical and emotional states. The performer can either select a specific sequence as he determines his needs at any point in time or he may elect to perform the entire Shibumi Kata by performing all four sequences in the recommended order. Each group is discussed in detail in the foregoing chapters.

Using their historical names, the four sequences (in recommended order) containing the eight primordial principles are:

Sequence # 1:

  •      To swallow;
  •      To spit;

Sequence # 2:

  •      To float;
  •      To sink;

Sequence # 3

  •      To burst;
  •      To bounce;

Sequence # 4:

  •      To spring;
  •      To lift.

An exact description of the physical movements and psychological states that I ascribe to each of the above follows in the foregoing chapters.

In closing, I wish you – Shibumi,

SHIBUMI-snow-daffodil

HANKO

Sensei John Szmitkowski

 © Copyright 2013 Issho Productions & John Szmitkowski, all rights reserved.

The “Eight Poems Of The Chinese Fist” are as follows:

  • 1. Jinshin wa tenchi ni onaji.
  • The mind is one with heaven and earth.
  • 2. Ketsumyaku wa nichigetsu ni nitari.
  • The circulatory rhythm of the body is similar to the cycle of the sun and the moon.
  • 3. Ho wa goju no donto su.
  • The way of inhaling and exhaling is hardness and softness.
  • 4. Mi wa toki ni shitagai hen ni ozu.
  • Act in accordance with time and change.
  • 5. Te wa ku ni ai sunawachi hairu.
  • Techniques will occur in the absence of conscious thought.
  • 6. Shintai wa hakarite riho su.
  • The feet must advance and retreat, separate and meet.
  • 7. Me wa shiho womiru wa yosu.
  • The eyes must not miss even the slightest change.
  • 8. Mimiwa yoku happo wo kiku.
  • The ears listen well in all eight directions.

Shibumi – Kata Framework: Inner Energy

4 Dec

IMPORTANT:

The foregoing is one component Chapter of an overall work describing the Shibumi Kata. To read the work in the order intended, please either click on the Shibumi Kata Page Tab above for a full Table Of Contents or this convenient            link: https://senseijohn.me/shibumi-kata/

Concept of Bio-energy:

Externally physical and psychological change is facilitated by bodily movement. Internally change is facilitated by directing your body’s inner energy. In ancient times this inner energy was referred to as “Chi” or “Ki”. In modern times these terms are still utilized in specific fields of endeavor.  I call this energy simply “Bio-energy.” BIO-energy resides within your “Hara” or belly. The exact point is located slightly below the belly button.

The ability to transport bio-energy within the confines of one’s own body is an integral component of the Shibumi Kata. In short, this is the ability to expand and contract one’s bio-energy from the Hara to the physical boundary of the entire human body. While the physical movements of the Shibumi Kata are somewhat easy to begin to learn, the internal transport of one’s bio-energy will take faith, time, energy and commitment to learn.

To learn to contract and expand your bio-energy, you must first perceive that it exists. It is important that you do not “visualize” your bio-energy. Visualization is wholly inadequate. Visualization is the mere physical effect of light passing through your eyes to the organ known as the brain where the light is processed. Every organ has a function (the stomach to digest, the heart to circulate blood, and the like). The higher function of the brain is the mind. It is the mind that processes the light from the eyes to form a recognizable pattern. It is this higher brain function, the mind, that is used to perceive the existence and movement of bio-energy within your body. Thus, you do not use your brain to visulaize the movement of bio-energy in your body, you use your mind to perceive such movement.

You must start to perceive its existence and residence within the Hara. As you inhale (in any of the manner previously discussed) perceive and be aware of your own energy. Perceive it contained in the Hara. As you exhale (again in any of the described manner), perceive that the bio-energy flows from your Hara throughout your body. The effect if that of filling and deflating a balloon. The ballon starts empty, symbolizing the bio-energy residing in the Hara. As you exhale, thus filing the balloon, the bio-energy flows to all points of your body and is bounded only by your skin. Again, like air fills the entire balloon.

The expansion and contraction of bio-energy is a fundamentally important internal process of the Shibumi Kata. The awareness of bio-energy and its flow can only be achieved through dedicated practice.

In closing, I wish you – Shibumi,

SHIBUMI-lotus sunset

HANKO

Sensei John Szmitkowski

 © Copyright 2013 Issho Productions & John Szmitkowski, all rights reserved.

Shibumi – Kata Framework: Posture

4 Dec

IMPORTANT:

The foregoing is one component Chapter of an overall work describing the Shibumi Kata. To read the work in the order intended, please either click on the Shibumi Kata Page Tab above for a full Table Of Contents or this convenient             link: https://senseijohn.me/shibumi-kata/

Shibumi Kata Posture:

As a condition precedent to learning the tactics (physical movements) of the Shibumi Kata, it is necessary to explore the mechanics of your posture. The exploration of posture begins with the act of standing erect. This is to say that one stands with one‘s head held high, eyes focused straight ahead, shoulders parallel to the floor and the back is straight. Though this is a common posture, standing erect has a very specific meaning.

Posture correction:

The point of departure from the normal meaning associated with standing erect is the function of standing with one’s back straight. Normally, one physically defines the back as straight by elongating the spine, by expanding the upper chest outward and elevating the shoulders upward. Such a definition is not adequate within the Shibumi Kata.

When one stands in the manner described above and places one’s hands in the small of the back, one notices that the small of the back is not straight but curved. This curvature is natural and helps to support the body through the spine. It is; however, improper for the Shibumi Kata.

To stand erect for purposes of the Shibumi Kata, the natural curvature of the spine must be temporarily straightened. To manipulate the back into a straight position, one should perform the following exercise.

Stand relaxed with both feet shoulder width apart and flat on the ground. Slightly bend your knees. The technique to straighten your back is to squeeze the cheeks of the buttocks tight and to rotate the hips down and forward. Now your spine is straight. Take a moment to try this movement then feel your lower back with your hand. If you have performed the hip rotation properly, you will notice that such rotation has removed the natural curvature of your spine so that your spine is now straight from top to bottom. This is the erect posture necessary for the Shibumi Kata. You can practice achieving this posture by standing as above and rotating your hips to achieve the posture and then subsequently relaxing the hips so as to again achieve natural curvature of the spine. Repeat this a few times to begin to have a feeling of comfort with the posture.

The above posture will be used throughout all of the stances and postures of the Shibumi Kata.

In closing, I wish you – Shibumi,

SHIBUMI-lotus sunset

HANKO

Sensei John Szmitkowski

 © Copyright 2013 Issho Productions & John Szmitkowski, all rights reserved.

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